Seeking Participation for Study on Mobility Needs

CU Denver Research Team wants to Understand how Transportation Infrastructure Affects Travel for Persons with Disabilities

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was created more than 30 years ago to protect the rights of persons with disabilities to access public and private spaces without facing discrimination. Since then, cities across the country have been working to create places and infrastructure that support the needs of people with disabilities. While progress has been made, many locations still fail to provide transportation services that all people can easily and independently navigate. A research team at the University of Colorado Denver seeks to understand how policy, technology, zoning, and design act together to influence the safety and quality of daily travel for people with disabilities.


The research team is currently seeking participants who identify as persons with disabilities, within the Denver area, who are willing to share their travel experiences, including how they might manage the following scenarios:


What would you do if you were traveling along this sidewalk?

Figure 1. A sidewalk in a residential area abruptly ends. After a long grassy area, the sidewalk continues.
Figure 1. A sidewalk in a residential area abruptly ends. After a long grassy area, the sidewalk continues.

If you could change one thing about this street to make your travel better, what would you change?

Figure 2. A narrow sidewalk next to a busy street. A wide grass area with a worn dirt path is next to the sidewalk.
Figure 2. A narrow sidewalk next to a busy street. A wide grass area with a worn dirt path is next to the sidewalk.

What do you think of when you encounter this scenario while traveling on the sidewalk?

Figure 3. Two e-scooters are laying across the entire width of the sidewalk at a bus stop.
Figure 3. Two e-scooters are laying across the entire width of the sidewalk at a bus stop.

What characteristics of this street have the most negative impact on your travel experience?

Figure 4. A residential street with knee-high grass growing on both sides. A bench and bus stop are ahead.
Figure 4. A residential street with knee-high grass growing on both sides. A bench and bus stop are ahead.

How would you rate your comfort and safety on this street?

Figure 5. A residential street without any cars. A makeshift sidewalk made of compacted rock sits on one side.
Figure 5. A residential street without any cars. A makeshift sidewalk made of compacted rock sits on one side.

Researchers hope the study's findings will influence how transportation infrastructure such as sidewalks, bus stops, buses/trains (and other street elements) can be better organized and designed to reduce daily travel challenges faced by persons with disabilities.



Do you identify as a person with a disability and want to share your transportation experiences?


Anyone who identifies as a person with a disability is encouraged to participate in the study, including but not limited to people with visual, auditory, physical, mental, or cognitive disabilities. Those interested in participating can fill out a short survey here: https://tinyurl.com/AccessibleCitySurvey.


Volunteers who fill out the survey may be contacted to participate in a 1-hour Zoom conversation to share more information about their experiences. The team is offering gift cards for those who successfully complete the interview.


Data collected by the research team will be used for this study, and all reports will be anonymous to protect participants' identities.


For questions about this study, please contact Professor Manish Shirgaokar, manish.shirgaokar@ucdenver.edu.

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